Last updated 27/07/2020

We are extremely pleased to be able to restart our business again and are aware of the anticipation for our products and services. We are busy contacting more customers every day and arranging for surveys and installations.

Rest assured that we will be in contact with you as soon as we can, and you can now look forward to your Home improvement starting.

Our online facility for registering service engineer requests or replacement parts is now available. Please submit your request here.

Introducing the Anglian Shop

Browse our range of window handles, door handles, letterplates and more. All available to buy online now.

NEW

Troubleshooting Self Help

If you think you have a problem with your windows, doors or conservatories, before contacting us please read through these troubleshooting hints and tips.

Windows
Condensation

What is condensation?

Condensation is the process of a substance changing from a gas to a liquid and is most commonly used to describe the appearance of water on surfaces. It is normally thought of as occurring when warm moist air meets cold surfaces, but this can be misleading when trying to understand its cause and in determining actions to prevent it occurring.

Windows condensation diagram

The air around us is a mixture of several gases. One of these is water vapour, which is water in the gas state (labelled A, above). The amount of water vapour that can be held in the air is dependent upon its temperature. Cold air can hold less than warm air. The amount of water vapour in the air is measured as a proportion of the maximum amount that could possibly be held at that particular temperature. This is called relative humidity. The importance of this feature is that, for any given relative humidity and air temperature there is another temperature known as the dew point. The dew point is the temperature at which the air can no longer hold the water as water vapour and it starts to appear as liquid water - condensation (labelled B, above).

It is important to remember that the factors influencing the formation of condensation are the relative humidity of the air and the air temperature. These two things determine the surface temperature needed for condensation to form. For example, the surface temperature required for condensation to occur when the air is warm and very humid is much higher than that needed when the air is cold and very dry.

There are three areas of our products where it is possible for condensation to occur:

  • The surface of the product which faces into the building.
  • The surface of the product which faces the external environment.
  • The surfaces within the sealed units. Of these three, only the last is a product fault.

Condensation can form on parts of the product that face into the building – the surface which you can touch when standing inside the room - when they are at or below the dew point of the air inside the building in the vicinity of the product.

The temperature of the internal face of the product is dependent upon both the inside and outside temperatures and is therefore within the control of the householder to some extent. We have already determined that the condensation depends upon the relative humidity and the air temperature, neither of which are product related but are within the control of the occupier of the building.

The control of this type of condensation is therefore the responsibility of the householder and its presence is not a product fault and should not lead to a replacement of a sealed unit. As it is not caused by a faulty product, a replacement unit subjected to the same conditions will result in the same type of condensation. This type of condensation can be controlled by such actions as reducing the humidity through ventilation (below) or ensuring surfaces do not get too cold by increasing room heating.

It is not uncommon for people to describe this kind of condensation incorrectly as “internal” as they interpret internal to mean inside the house rather than inside the sealed unit. For more detailed information, refer to the GGF booklet “Some causes, some advice” which can be found on the GGF website, www.ggf.org.uk

Windows condensation diagram Windows condensation diagram

It is possible that condensation can form on the surface of the product which faces the external environment (labelled A) – the surface which you can touch when you are standing outside the building.

High performance glazing can result in the outside surface becoming quite cold. This is because (as intended) the heat in the house is being kept inside and is not getting through to heat the outside surface of the glazing (labelled B).

At night, the outside surface radiates heat to the environment, trying to become the same temperature. If the heat from the house is not being transmitted you can see that the outside surface can get quite cold. If it is a cold, clear night, the outside surface of the glass may become much colder than the air and drop below the dew point of the air. In this circumstance, dew can form on the glass just as it does on the grass or on a car (labelled C).

The formation of this condensation is an indication that the product is doing what you expect of it - keeping the heat in your house and sharing as little as possible with the outside.

My window handle is loose

Over many years of use your handle fixings may become loose, they can be tightened as shown in the following figures.

  1. Carefully remove top cover cap.
    Windows handle diagram
  2. Tighten top screw using Pozidriv screwdriver and push cover cap back into place.
    Windows handle diagram
  3. Move handle to the open position and tighten bottom fixing.
    Windows handle diagram

My window is stiff to move (PVCU and Aluminium)

Have you lubricated your hinges? Regular lubrication of the moving components is necessary to keep your windows operating properly. The following lubrication and maintenance checks should be carried out once a year.

PLEASE DO use a general light engineering oil with corrosion inhibitors such as 3-in-one® Multi-Purpose Oil (available in aerosol can for convenience).

PLEASE DO NOT use solvent based lubricants such as WD40®. These contain chemicals that attack components of your window. This can result in weakening and breaking of parts of the window and may stop them functioning. It will also damage decorative finishes.

Casement Windows - Hinges

Annually lubricate all pivot points with oil and wipe away excess.

Windows

Casement Windows - Locks

Annually lubricate the slider and gearbox to help with ease of operation.

Windows

Tilt and Turn Windows

The diagram below indicates the exact points that require lubrication. A drop of oil applied annually to each point will be enough to keep your Tilt Turn windows in perfect working order.

Windows

  1. Top Arm — The top arm must be oiled once a year, at all pivot points. Add a small amount of oil to the points shown.
    Windows
  2. Top Hinge — These are only fitted to Tilt & Turn windows that open to 180º and are generally fitted in conservatories. The top hinge (left) must be oiled once a year, at all pivot points. Add a small amount of oil to the points shown. Remove the plastic cover if fitted and add a small amount of oil onto the top of the hinge.
    Windows
  3. Keeps — In order to maintain the smooth-running action, the keeps must be lubricated once a year by applying petroleum jelly (Vaseline) or a light oil on the contact areas/leading edges.
    Windows
  4. Rollers — To help the smooth-running action of the locking mechanism, annually apply a small amount of oil to each side of the rollers.
    Windows

I can’t close/open my window

Caution. Take care to avoid any risk of falling from an open window.

Is the window almost closed?

Check there is no debris in the frame preventing the window closing. Make sure the handle is in the fully opened position before closing and locking your window.

Problems opening your window

Check that the window is not locked with the key. Make sure there is no obstruction outside preventing the window from opening.

Do you have a restricted hinge?

These are designed to only open to about 10º to prevent accidents. To open the window fully, press the button on the slider (circled in image) to disengage the restrictor. You will be required to do this on both sides of a top hinged window and just the bottom one on a side hinged window.
Windows hinge

My window won’t stay at the position I open it to

It is possible that the adjuster screw on the hinge is too loose. This can be tightened with a flat head screwdriver to increase the resistance between the slider and the hinge track.

Should you find that your window does not stay in the position that you have opened it to, or it is stiff to move, you can increase or decrease the friction on the stay.

Windows

This can be done by turning the adjuster screw on the stay (above) clockwise to increase the friction or anti-clockwise to decrease the friction.

I have a draught around my window

Air movement detected near to a window or door may be due to natural currents caused by heating or cooling of the air (known as convection) and is not necessarily due to air leakage through the window or door. In certain weather conditions a small amount of air coming through the seals is acceptable.

If you are experiencing a draught around the opening of your window or door you can check to see that the 2 rows of seals around the frame have not been dislodged. These can be lightly pushed back into place if needed. Night/Trickle vents (where fitted) are not designed to be air-tight when closed.

If you have a Tilt & Turn window you can change the seal pressure yourself which may resolve the problem:
Windows draught diagram

By adjusting the rollers labelled D (above). There are 2 types of rollers to adjust. These can both be adjusted by +/- 0.8mm. With an 4mm Allen key, rotate the roller.
Windows draught diagram

Water is visible in my frame

This is nothing to worry about, our windows are designed to drain away any water before it can leak into your property. There are drainage slots on the bottom of the frame that allow the water to drain out between the window and sill.

If you are experiencing any water entering your property, ensure that the drainage slots, shown below, are kept unblocked and free from dirt, grit, spiders’ webs, etc. This will allow any water that appears in the frame to drain away and prevent any leaks. In addition, check to make sure the seals haven’t been dislodged from the frame.
Windows diagram

Doors
I have a draught around my door

Air movement detected near to a window or door may be due to natural currents caused by heating or cooling of the air (known as convection) and is not necessarily due to air leakage through the window or door. In certain weather conditions a small amount of air coming through the seals is acceptable.

If you are experiencing a draught around the opening of your window or door you can check to see that the 2 rows of seals around the frame have not been dislodged. These can be lightly pushed back into place if needed. Night/Trickle vents (where fitted) are not designed to be air-tight when closed.

Problems closing my door

Is the door almost closed?

Check there is no debris in the frame preventing the door closing. Make sure the handle is in the fully opened position before closing your door.

Is the door failing to stay closed?

Open the door to check the locking gear operates when the handle is operated. To do this, move the handle to see if the hooks move. If they don’t, lubrication could help this. Ensure the sliding black snib is pushed downwards.

My lock cylinder is stiff to operate

The Master Locksmiths Association advises lubricating the cylinder with lock graphite (or graphite pencil). Apply this lubricant to key only and work the key in and out of cylinder a few times, never apply lubricant directly into the cylinder as this may cause the internal pins to stick. Do not use WD40® or other oils. For key operated locks (non-lever handle) relieve the pressure on the hooks by gently pulling or pushing the door closed against the seal, then turn the key.

Replacement Yale/Ultion Door Keys

With every set of unique keys for your cylinder you will receive a unique Key Identification Card. It is important that you keep this key code card in a safe and secure place. If you require additional or replacement keys there are several options, you can take:

  1. [Recommended] Register your unique key by creating a secure account (as applicable) on either Yale or Ultion’s website, the website will guide you through the steps required, you will need your unique Key Identification Card handy to record your unique key reference which can be found on the back of this card. From this site you will be able to order additional or replacement keys which will be delivered direct to your door. (Please Note ordering additional or replacement keys will come at a cost.)
  2. [Recommended] Call the telephone number on the front of your key code card and request additional or replacement keys. (Please Note ordering additional or replacement keys will come at a cost.)
  3. The Yale and Ultion 3 Star keys are patented designs; they can be obtained from various locksmiths who will be able to provide you with a key cut should you require one in case of urgent requirements. Please ensure you receive a genuine key to the same specifications.

Important to Note

Whilst it is appreciated some keys will need to be cut urgently, the recommendations should be followed as a priority. This is so you can be sure you receive the genuine key that is cut to the exact specification of the cylinder within your Anglian door. Non genuine keys could also invalidate the additional security guarantee issued with your door.

Conservatories
Water in your gutters or boxgutters on your conservatory

Unlike the gutter on your house, which is often fitted at a slight angle, those on a conservatory are laid level. Visible standing water may remain in the gutters as a result of this. This is perfectly acceptable and in accordance with the code of Practice for Drainage of Roofs. BSEN12056-3:2000

Condensation

What is condensation?

Condensation is the process of a substance changing from a gas to a liquid and is most commonly used to describe the appearance of water on surfaces. It is normally thought of as occurring when warm moist air meets cold surfaces, but this can be misleading when trying to understand its cause and in determining actions to prevent it occurring.

Windows condensation diagram

The air around us is a mixture of several gases. One of these is water vapour, which is water in the gas state (labelled A, above). The amount of water vapour that can be held in the air is dependent upon its temperature. Cold air can hold less than warm air. The amount of water vapour in the air is measured as a proportion of the maximum amount that could possibly be held at that particular temperature. This is called relative humidity. The importance of this feature is that, for any given relative humidity and air temperature there is another temperature known as the dew point. The dew point is the temperature at which the air can no longer hold the water as water vapour and it starts to appear as liquid water - condensation (labelled B, above).

It is important to remember that the factors influencing the formation of condensation are the relative humidity of the air and the air temperature. These two things determine the surface temperature needed for condensation to form. For example, the surface temperature required for condensation to occur when the air is warm and very humid is much higher than that needed when the air is cold and very dry.

There are three areas of our products where it is possible for condensation to occur:

  • The surface of the product which faces into the building.
  • The surface of the product which faces the external environment.
  • The surfaces within the sealed units. Of these three, only the last is a product fault.

Condensation can form on parts of the product that face into the building – the surface which you can touch when standing inside the room - when they are at or below the dew point of the air inside the building in the vicinity of the product.

The temperature of the internal face of the product is dependent upon both the inside and outside temperatures and is therefore within the control of the householder to some extent. We have already determined that the condensation depends upon the relative humidity and the air temperature, neither of which are product related but are within the control of the occupier of the building.

The control of this type of condensation is therefore the responsibility of the householder and its presence is not a product fault and should not lead to a replacement of a sealed unit. As it is not caused by a faulty product, a replacement unit subjected to the same conditions will result in the same type of condensation. This type of condensation can be controlled by such actions as reducing the humidity through ventilation (below) or ensuring surfaces do not get too cold by increasing room heating.

It is not uncommon for people to describe this kind of condensation incorrectly as “internal” as they interpret internal to mean inside the house rather than inside the sealed unit. For more detailed information, refer to the GGF booklet “Some causes, some advice” which can be found on the GGF website, www.ggf.org.uk

Windows condensation diagram Windows condensation diagram

It is possible that condensation can form on the surface of the product which faces the external environment (labelled A) – the surface which you can touch when you are standing outside the building.

High performance glazing can result in the outside surface becoming quite cold. This is because (as intended) the heat in the house is being kept inside and is not getting through to heat the outside surface of the glazing (labelled B).

At night, the outside surface radiates heat to the environment, trying to become the same temperature. If the heat from the house is not being transmitted you can see that the outside surface can get quite cold. If it is a cold, clear night, the outside surface of the glass may become much colder than the air and drop below the dew point of the air. In this circumstance, dew can form on the glass just as it does on the grass or on a car (labelled C).

The formation of this condensation is an indication that the product is doing what you expect of it - keeping the heat in your house and sharing as little as possible with the outside.

Problems closing my door

Is the door almost closed?

Check there is no debris in the frame preventing the door closing. Make sure the handle is in the fully opened position before closing your door.

Is the door failing to stay closed?

Open the door to check the locking gear operates when the handle is operated. To do this, move the handle to see if the hooks move. If they don’t, lubrication could help this. Ensure the sliding black snib is pushed downwards.

My window handle is loose

Over many years of use your handle fixings may become loose, they can be tightened as shown in the following figures.

  1. Carefully remove top cover cap.
    Windows handle diagram
  2. Tighten top screw using Pozidriv screwdriver and push cover cap back into place.
    Windows handle diagram
  3. Move handle to the open position and tighten bottom fixing.
    Windows handle diagram

My window is stiff to move (PVCU and Aluminium)

Have you lubricated your hinges? Regular lubrication of the moving components is necessary to keep your windows operating properly. The following lubrication and maintenance checks should be carried out once a year.

PLEASE DO use a general light engineering oil with corrosion inhibitors such as 3-in-one® Multi-Purpose Oil (available in aerosol can for convenience).

PLEASE DO NOT use solvent based lubricants such as WD40®. These contain chemicals that attack components of your window. This can result in weakening and breaking of parts of the window and may stop them functioning. It will also damage decorative finishes.

Casement Windows - Hinges

Annually lubricate all pivot points with oil and wipe away excess.

Windows

Casement Windows - Locks

Annually lubricate the slider and gearbox to help with ease of operation.

Windows

Tilt and Turn Windows

The diagram below indicates the exact points that require lubrication. A drop of oil applied annually to each point will be enough to keep your Tilt Turn windows in perfect working order.

Windows

  1. Top Arm — The top arm must be oiled once a year, at all pivot points. Add a small amount of oil to the points shown.
    Windows
  2. Top Hinge — These are only fitted to Tilt & Turn windows that open to 180º and are generally fitted in conservatories. The top hinge (left) must be oiled once a year, at all pivot points. Add a small amount of oil to the points shown. Remove the plastic cover if fitted and add a small amount of oil onto the top of the hinge.
    Windows
  3. Keeps — In order to maintain the smooth-running action, the keeps must be lubricated once a year by applying petroleum jelly (Vaseline) or a light oil on the contact areas/leading edges.
    Windows
  4. Rollers — To help the smooth-running action of the locking mechanism, annually apply a small amount of oil to each side of the rollers.
    Windows

I can’t close/open my window

Caution. Take care to avoid any risk of falling from an open window.

Is the window almost closed?

Check there is no debris in the frame preventing the window closing. Make sure the handle is in the fully opened position before closing and locking your window.

Problems opening your window

Check that the window is not locked with the key. Make sure there is no obstruction outside preventing the window from opening.

Do you have a restricted hinge?

These are designed to only open to about 10º to prevent accidents. To open the window fully, press the button on the slider (circled in image) to disengage the restrictor. You will be required to do this on both sides of a top hinged window and just the bottom one on a side hinged window.
Windows hinge

My window won’t stay at the position I open it to

It is possible that the adjuster screw on the hinge is too loose. This can be tightened with a flat head screwdriver to increase the resistance between the slider and the hinge track.

Should you find that your window does not stay in the position that you have opened it to, or it is stiff to move, you can increase or decrease the friction on the stay.

Windows

This can be done by turning the adjuster screw on the stay (above) clockwise to increase the friction or anti-clockwise to decrease the friction.

Sales Questions

Can you provide a remote quotation/price online?

We are now offering both Remote Design Consultations and In-Home Consultations. Request your free no obligation quote here.

Installation Questions

I’m waiting on my survey - what should I do?

We are extremely pleased to be able to restart our business again and are aware of the anticipation for our products and services. We are busy contacting more customers every day and arranging for surveys.

Rest assured that we will be in contact with you as soon as we can, and you can now look forward to your home improvement starting.

I’m waiting on my Installation - what should I do?

Our factories are now operational and working hard to fulfil your order. Our installation teams will be in touch shortly to confirm your date of installation.

I have scaffolding around my home

We are in the process of contacting our customers to arrange completion of installations. Please monitor your personal emails, as we will continue to update you on your specific project via email.

In the interim, please be advised that for health & safety reasons the access equipment should not be used by you or any third party for any purpose whatsoever. You will not be covered by any insurance policy. The equipment remains the property of the Scaffold Company.

Service Matters

How can I book a service engineer visit?

Our online facility for registering service engineer requests or replacement parts is now available. Request your visit here.

Please note that all requests for service engineer visits or replacement parts must be made through our website as we cannot accept requests via email or by phone.

My service appointment has been cancelled

As all previous existing appointments have been cancelled due to the Covid-19 pandemic we ask that all customers who would like to request service engineer visits or replacement parts use the online function as we cannot accept requests via email or by phone.

Our online facility for registering service engineer requests or replacement parts is now available here.

I’m looking to upgrade my existing window & door furniture

Our online shop is now available to order window handles, door handles, door lock cylinders, letterplates, door knockers and much more. Visit the Anglian Shop.

Troubleshooting

Please take a look at our Troubleshooting content where you can find useful information and self help guides.

Anything else?

How can I keep in touch with you?

We continue to update our website as we return to a full operation. Please ensure you check back in with us frequently for any updates.

If you are an existing customer, please monitor your personal emails, as we will continue to update you on your specific project via email during this period.

I have an emergency what should I do?

Please check our ‘Troubleshooting’ content. Here you will find some useful information and self help guides.

If your query is critical, please email us at: [email protected]. We will do our very best to respond within a timely manner.